Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein 

  
Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein; 455 pages

Rose is an American ATA pilot during World War II, stationed in the UK. He duties are to fly planes between bases for maintenance, for use, to take people to and from, etc. Then she is asked to fly her uncle to France. She never made it back. Rose was lost somewhere on continental Europe in September 1944. 

Some spoilers beyond this point. 

Elizabeth Wein is quickly becoming one of my favorite historical fiction authors. She made a note at the end of the book to remind readers that what she wrote was fiction but it was based off of things that actually went on during the war. 

Rose is such an engaging character. She is young and naive at the start. She wants to do more than just transfer planes between bases, she wants to be part of the action. She wants to fly planes in France. When she finally gets her chance, she encounters a doodlebug, one of Germany’s flying bombs. And then she encounters the German planes. Now she is captured by the Germans and sent to one of their work camps. 

Once you get to the camps you meet a wide variety of characters. The people you couldn’t help but pity were the Rabbits. They were the ones the Nazi experimented on at the start of the war. Now they are all disfigured but the Nazi are afraid to kill them because their names somehow got out of the camps and it was revealed what was done to them. Everyone in that camp worked to protect those girls and it was a truly inspiring story. 

I absolutely loved this book. It is something that people should read. It’s so important to know what happened. We need to know so it doesn’t happen again. 

Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

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